Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online We Survived Wars Crucible:A True Story of Imprisonment and Rescue in World War II Philippines file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with We Survived Wars Crucible:A True Story of Imprisonment and Rescue in World War II Philippines book. Happy reading We Survived Wars Crucible:A True Story of Imprisonment and Rescue in World War II Philippines Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF We Survived Wars Crucible:A True Story of Imprisonment and Rescue in World War II Philippines at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF We Survived Wars Crucible:A True Story of Imprisonment and Rescue in World War II Philippines Pocket Guide.
Лідери продажу в категорії

I'd love for people to populate the list with as many great titles as possible. I'm a shameless addict of anything Pacific War, and this will help me to construct a good "to read" list. I've only read the first volume of this series, which was very good but check out by Samuel Eliot Morison. I've added 15 more books I felt should be on this list. Sep 28, AM. Thanks, Dr. Looks like some definite additions to my ever-increasing "to read" list. Wurmo, I highly recommend Richard E.

Overton's book God Isn't Here. That one does sound great and what a great cover, for whatever that's worth. I'll definitely check it out. Just finished "Phantom Warrior" last month. The last third of the book is some of the most exciting reading I've tackled in years. Add a reference: Book Author. Search for a book to add a reference. We take abuse seriously in our discussion boards. Only flag comments that clearly need our attention. We will not remove any content for bad language alone, or being critical of a particular book. Add books from: My Books or a Search. Friends Votes.

How to Vote To vote on existing books from the list, beside each book there is a link vote for this book clicking it will add that book to your votes. Flag this list. Inappropriate The list including its title or description facilitates illegal activity, or contains hate speech or ad hominem attacks on a fellow Goodreads member or author.

Spam or Self-Promotional The list is spam or self-promotional. Incorrect Book The list contains an incorrect book please specify the title of the book. Welcome back. Just a moment while we sign you in to your Goodreads account. Sledge 4. Rate this book Clear rating 1 of 5 stars 2 of 5 stars 3 of 5 stars 4 of 5 stars 5 of 5 stars. Navy's Finest Hour by James D.


  • La Corruption de la Justice: Un avocat face au système Mon histoire vraie Comment ils ont détruit ma vie (French Edition).
  • How to Vote.
  • Product details!
  • Victory at Sea - The Atlantic.
  • Brownies (Variations gourmandes) (French Edition).
  • Adult College Babes Picture Wild Wet And Horny (Adult Picture Book Book 2).
  • Лідери продажу в категорії "Військова справа".

Hornfischer Goodreads Author 4. Want to Read saving… Error rating book. Neptune's Inferno: The U. Navy at Guadalcanal by James D. Lukacs Goodreads Author 4. Toll 4. Helmet for My Pillow by Robert Leckie 4. Wukovits 4. Bradley 4. Frank 4. Prange 4. Day of Infamy by Walter Lord 4.

Recommended Resources

The Battle of Midway by Craig L. Symonds 4. Samurai by Saburo Sakai 4. Spector 4. Mrazek Goodreads Author 4. Miracle at Midway by Gordon W. Kokoda by Paul Ham Goodreads Author 4. Bergerud 4. Lawson 4. Nimitz by E. Potter 4. Ross 4. Silent Victory: The U. Norman Goodreads Author 4. Ross 3. Scott 4. Lundstrom 4.

Account Options

Layton 4. Thunder Below! Fluckey 4. Springer 4. Borneman 4. Island Fighting by Rafael Steinberg 4. In accordance with this policy, McKinley began to negotiate with the Spanish government, hoping that the negotiations would be able to end the yellow journalism in the United States, and therefore, end the loudest calls to go to war with Spain. An attempt was made to negotiate a peace before McKinley took office. However, the Spanish refused to take part in the negotiations.

In McKinley appointed Stewart L. Woodford as the new minister to Spain, who again offered to negotiate a peace. In October , the Spanish government still refused the United States offer to negotiate between the Spanish and the Cubans, but promised the U. First, the new Spanish government told the United States that it was willing to offer a change in the Reconcentration policies the main set of policies that was feeding yellow journalism in the United States if the Cuban rebels agreed to a cessation of hostilities.

This time the rebels refused the terms in hopes that continued conflict would lead to U. This action alarmed many Cubans loyal to Spain. The Cubans loyal to Weyler began planning large demonstrations to take place when the next Governor General, Ramon Blanco, arrived in Cuba. State Department to send a U. While Maine was docked in Havana, an explosion sank the ship. The sinking of Maine was blamed on the Spanish and made the possibility of a negotiated peace very slim.

McKinley sent USS Maine to Havana to ensure the safety of American citizens and interests, and to underscore the urgent need for reform. Naval forces were moved in position to attack simultaneously on several fronts if the war was not avoided. Others were also moved just off the shore of Lisbon, and still others were moved to Hong Kong. At on the evening of February 15, , Maine sank in Havana Harbor after suffering a massive explosion. While McKinley urged patience and did not declare that Spain had caused the explosion, the deaths of out of [57] sailors on board focused American attention.

Most American leaders took the position that the cause of the explosion was unknown, but public attention was now riveted on the situation and Spain could not find a diplomatic solution to avoid war. Spain appealed to the European powers, most of whom advised it to accept U. Navy's investigation, made public on March 28, concluded that the ship's powder magazines were ignited when an external explosion was set off under the ship's hull.

This report poured fuel on popular indignation in the US, making the war inevitable. Other investigations in later years came to various contradictory conclusions, but had no bearing on the coming of the war. In , Admiral Hyman George Rickover had his staff look at the documents and decided there was an internal explosion. A study commissioned by National Geographic magazine in , using AME computer modelling, stated that the explosion could have been caused by a mine, but no definitive evidence was found.

After Maine was destroyed, New York City newspaper publishers Hearst and Pulitzer decided that the Spanish were to blame, and they publicized this theory as fact in their papers. Their press exaggerated what was happening and how the Spanish were treating the Cuban prisoners. A common myth falsely states that when illustrator Frederic Remington said there was no war brewing in Cuba, Hearst responded: "You furnish the pictures and I'll furnish the war. This new " yellow journalism " was, however, uncommon outside New York City, and historians no longer consider it the major force shaping the national mood.

Wall Street, big business, high finance and Main Street businesses across the country were vocally opposed to war and demanded peace. After years of severe depression, the economic outlook for the domestic economy was suddenly bright again in However, the uncertainties of warfare posed a serious threat to full economic recovery. The leading railroad magazine editorialized, "From a commercial and mercenary standpoint it seems peculiarly bitter that this war should come when the country had already suffered so much and so needed rest and peace. A speech delivered by Republican Senator Redfield Proctor of Vermont on March 17, , thoroughly analyzed the situation and greatly strengthened the pro-war cause.

Proctor concluded that war was the only answer. Teller of Colorado proposed the Teller Amendment to ensure that the U. The amendment, disclaiming any intention to annex Cuba, passed the Senate 42 to 35; the House concurred the same day, to 6. The amended resolution demanded Spanish withdrawal and authorized the President to use as much military force as he thought necessary to help Cuba gain independence from Spain.

President McKinley signed the joint resolution on April 20, , and the ultimatum was sent to Spain. On April 25, the U. Congress declared that a state of war between the U. The Navy was ready, but the Army was not well-prepared for the war and made radical changes in plans and quickly purchased supplies. In the spring of , the strength of the U. Regular Army was just 25, men. The Army wanted 50, new men but received over , through volunteers and the mobilization of state National Guard units , [71] even gaining nearly , men on the first night after the explosion of USS Maine.

The overwhelming consensus of observers in the s, and historians ever since, is that an upsurge of humanitarian concern with the plight of the Cubans was the main motivating force that caused the war with Spain in McKinley put it succinctly in late that if Spain failed to resolve its crisis, the United States would see "a duty imposed by our obligations to ourselves, to civilization and humanity to intervene with force. Louis Perez states, "Certainly the moralistic determinants of war in has been accorded preponderant explanatory weight in the historiography.

They discredited the idealism by suggesting the people were deliberately misled by propaganda and sensationalist yellow journalism. Political scientist Robert Osgood, writing in , led the attack on the American decision process as a confused mix of "self-righteousness and genuine moral fervor," in the form of a "crusade" and a combination of "knight-errantry and national self- assertiveness. In his War and Empire , [21] Prof. Paul Atwood of the University of Massachusetts Boston writes:. The Spanish—American War was fomented on outright lies and trumped up accusations against the intended enemy.

War fever in the general population never reached a critical temperature until the accidental sinking of the USS Maine was deliberately, and falsely, attributed to Spanish villainy. In a cryptic message Senator Lodge wrote that 'There may be an explosion any day in Cuba which would settle a great many things. We have got a battleship in the harbor of Havana, and our fleet, which overmatches anything the Spanish have, is masked at the Dry Tortugas. In his autobiography, [77] Theodore Roosevelt gave his views of the origins of the war:.

Our own direct interests were great, because of the Cuban tobacco and sugar, and especially because of Cuba's relation to the projected Isthmian [Panama] Canal. But even greater were our interests from the standpoint of humanity. It was our duty, even more from the standpoint of National honor than from the standpoint of National interest, to stop the devastation and destruction.

Because of these considerations I favored war. In the years of Spanish rule, the Philippines developed from a small overseas colony governed from the Viceroyalty of New Spain to a land with modern elements in the cities. The Spanish-speaking middle classes of the 19th century were mostly educated in the liberal ideas coming from Europe. This movement eventually led to the Philippine Revolution against Spanish colonial rule. The revolution had been in a state of truce since the signing of the Pact of Biak-na-Bato in , with revolutionary leaders having accepted exile outside of the country.

On April 23, , a document appeared in the Manila Gazette newspaper warning of the impending war and calling for Filipinos to participate on the side of Spain. The Germans, with interests of their own, were eager to take advantage of whatever opportunities the conflict in the islands might afford. Commodore Dewey transported Emilio Aguinaldo , a Filipino leader who had led rebellion against Spanish rule in the Philippines in , from exile in Hong Kong to the Philippines to rally more Filipinos against the Spanish colonial government.

This later led to the Philippine—American War , [99] which would prove to be more deadly and costly than the Spanish—American War. General Merritt formally accepted the surrender and declared the establishment of a U. Armed conflict broke out between U. On June 20, a U.

Charleston fired a few rounds at Fort Santa Cruz without receiving return fire. Two local officials, not knowing that war had been declared and believing the firing had been a salute, came out to Charleston to apologize for their inability to return the salute as they were out of gunpowder. Glass informed them that the U. The following day, Glass sent Lieutenant William Braunersruehter to meet the Spanish Governor to arrange the surrender of the island and the Spanish garrison there. Some 54 Spanish infantry were captured and transported to the Philippines as prisoners of war.

Theodore Roosevelt advocated intervention in Cuba, both for the Cuban people and to promote the Monroe Doctrine. He also worked with Leonard Wood in convincing the Army to raise an all-volunteer regiment, the 1st U. Volunteer Cavalry. Wood was given command of the regiment that quickly became known as the " Rough Riders ". The Americans planned to capture the city of Santiago de Cuba to destroy Linares' army and Cervera's fleet.

The Cubans harbored a great deal of discontent towards the Spanish Government, due to years of manipulation on the part of the Spanish. The prospect of getting the United States involved in the fight was considered by many Cubans as a step in the right direction. While the Cubans were wary of the United States' intentions, the overwhelming support from the American public provided the Cubans with some peace of mind, because they believed that the United States was committed to helping them achieve their independence. However, with the imposition of the Platt Amendment of after the war, as well as economic and military manipulation on the part of the United States, Cuban sentiment towards the United States became polarized, with many Cubans disappointed with continuing American interference.

A contingent of Spanish troops, having fought a skirmish with the Americans near Siboney on June 23, had retired to their lightly entrenched positions at Las Guasimas. An advance guard of U. The battle ended indecisively in favor of Spain and the Spanish left Las Guasimas on their planned retreat to Santiago. Army employed Civil War -era skirmishers at the head of the advancing columns. Three of four of the U. Grant , and Captain Allyn K. Capron, Jr.

The Battle of Las Guasimas showed the U. Americans advanced by rushes and stayed in the weeds so that they, too, were largely invisible to the Spaniards who used un-targeted volley fire to try to mass fires against the advancing Americans. While some troops were hit, this technique was mostly a waste of bullets as the Americans learned to duck as soon as they heard the Spanish word Fire, "Fuego" yelled by the Spanish officers. Spanish troops were equipped with smokeless powder arms that also helped them to hide their positions while firing.

Other irregular troops were armed with Remington Rolling Block rifles in. Both the U. In later battles, state volunteers used the. On July 1, a combined force of about 15, American troops in regular infantry and cavalry regiments, including all four of the army's "Colored" Buffalo soldier regiments, and volunteer regiments, among them Roosevelt and his " Rough Riders ", the 71st New York , the 2nd Massachusetts Infantry, and 1st North Carolina, and rebel Cuban forces attacked 1, entrenched Spaniards in dangerous Civil War-style frontal assaults at the Battle of El Caney and Battle of San Juan Hill outside of Santiago.

First Lieutenant John J. Pershing , nicknamed "Black Jack", oversaw the 10th Cavalry Unit during the war. Pershing and his unit fought in the Battle of San Juan Hill. Pershing was cited for his gallantry during the battle. This was not true of the Escario relief column from Manzanillo, [] which fought its way past determined Cuban resistance but arrived too late to participate in the siege. Spanish troops successfully defended Fort Canosa, allowing them to stabilize their line and bar the entry to Santiago. The Americans and Cubans forcibly began a bloody, strangling siege of the city.

Once completed, these parapets were occupied by U. American troops, while suffering daily losses from Spanish fire, suffered far more casualties from heat exhaustion and mosquito -borne disease. Lieutenant Carter P. Johnson of the Buffalo Soldiers' 10th Cavalry , with experience in special operations roles as head of the 10th Cavalry's attached Apache scouts in the Apache Wars , chose 50 soldiers from the regiment to lead a deployment mission with at least Cuban soldiers under Cuban Brigadier General Emilio Nunez and other supplies to the mouth of the San Juan River east of Cienfuegos.

On June 29, , a reconnaissance team in landing boats from the transports Florida and Fanita attempted to land on the beach, but were repelled by Spanish fire.


  1. Flag this list;
  2. ΔΕΛΤΙΟ ΤΑΥΤΟΤΗΤΑΣ (αστυνομική ιστορία): Identity Card (Short Story / IN GREEK).
  3. Gruppenarbeit in der Produktion (German Edition)?
  4. Book Reviews;
  5. معلومات عن المنتج;
  6. A second attempt was made on June 30, , but a team of reconnaissance soldiers was trapped on the beach near the mouth of the Tallabacoa River. A team of four soldiers saved this group and were awarded Medals of Honor. The major port of Santiago de Cuba was the main target of naval operations during the war. Marines with naval support. On April 23, a council of senior admirals of the Spanish Navy had decided to order Admiral Pascual Cervera y Topete 's squadron of four armored cruisers and three torpedo boat destroyers to proceed from their present location in Cape Verde having left from Cadiz, Spain to the West Indies.

    In May, the fleet of Spanish Admiral Pascual Cervera y Topete had been spotted by American forces in Santiago harbor, where they had taken shelter for protection from sea attack. A two-month stand-off between Spanish and American naval forces followed. When the Spanish squadron finally attempted to leave the harbor on July 3, the American forces destroyed or grounded five of the six ships.

    During the stand-off, U. The mission was a failure, and Hobson and his crew were captured. They were exchanged on July 6, and Hobson became a national hero; he received the Medal of Honor in , retired as a Rear Admiral and became a Congressman. Yellow fever had quickly spread amongst the American occupation force, crippling it.

    A group of concerned officers of the American army chose Theodore Roosevelt to draft a request to Washington that it withdraw the Army, a request that paralleled a similar one from General Shafter, who described his force as an "army of convalescents". On August 7, the American invasion force started to leave Cuba. The evacuation was not total. Army kept the black Ninth U. Cavalry Regiment in Cuba to support the occupation. The logic was that their race and the fact that many black volunteers came from southern states would protect them from disease; this logic led to these soldiers being nicknamed "Immunes".

    Still, when the Ninth left, 73 of its soldiers had contracted the disease. In May , Lt. Henry H. He provided maps and information on the Spanish military forces to the U. The American offensive began on May 12, , when a squadron of 12 U. William T. Though the damage inflicted on the city was minimal, the Americans established a blockade in the city's harbor, San Juan Bay.

    On June 22, the cruiser Isabel II and the destroyer Terror delivered a Spanish counterattack , but were unable to break the blockade and Terror was damaged. The land offensive began on July 25, when 1, infantry soldiers led by Nelson A. The first organized armed opposition occurred in Yauco in what became known as the Battle of Yauco. This encounter was followed by the Battle of Fajardo.

    The United States seized control of Fajardo on August 1, but were forced to withdraw on August 5 after a group of Puerto Rican-Spanish soldiers led by Pedro del Pino gained control of the city, while most civilian inhabitants fled to a nearby lighthouse.

    Freedom @ Dawn by Col Quesada

    The Americans encountered larger opposition during the Battle of Guayama and as they advanced towards the main island's interior. On August 9, , American troops that were pursuing units retreating from Coamo encountered heavy resistance in Aibonito in a mountain known as Cerro Gervasio del Asomante and retreated after six of their soldiers were injured.

    They returned three days later, reinforced with artillery units and attempted a surprise attack. In the subsequent crossfire, confused soldiers reported seeing Spanish reinforcements nearby and five American officers were gravely injured, which prompted a retreat order. All military actions in Puerto Rico were suspended on August 13, after U.


    • Victory at Sea - The Atlantic?
    • Spanish–American War - Wikipedia.
    • Account Options.

    With defeats in Cuba and the Philippines, and both of its fleets destroyed, Spain sued for peace and negotiations were opened between the two parties. However, the U. The war lasted ten weeks.

    Military Topic

    Army and all of them again carrying similar ranks. Rosser and Joseph Wheeler , though only the latter had seen action. Still, in an exciting moment during the Battle of Las Guasimas, Wheeler apparently forgot for a moment which war he was fighting, having supposedly called out "Let's go, boys! We've got the damn Yankees on the run again! The war marked American entry into world affairs. Since then, the U. The Panic of was over by this point, and the U.

    The war redefined national identity, served as a solution of sorts to the social divisions plaguing the American mind, and provided a model for all future news reporting. The idea of American imperialism changed in the public's mind after the short and successful Spanish—American War.

    Due to the United States' powerful influence diplomatically and militarily, Cuba 's status after the war relied heavily upon American actions. Two major developments emerged from the Spanish—American War: one, it greatly enforced the United States' vision of itself as a "defender of democracy" and as a major world power, and two, it had severe implications for Cuban—American relations in the future.

    The war greatly reduced the Spanish Empire. Spain had been declining as an imperial power since the early 19th century as a result of Napoleon's invasion. The loss of Cuba caused a national trauma because of the affinity of peninsular Spaniards with Cuba, which was seen as another province of Spain rather than as a colony. The Spanish soldier Julio Cervera Baviera , who served in the Puerto Rican Campaign , published a pamphlet in which he blamed the natives of that colony for its occupation by the Americans, saying, "I have never seen such a servile, ungrateful country [i.

    In twenty-four hours, the people of Puerto Rico went from being fervently Spanish to enthusiastically American They humiliated themselves, giving in to the invader as the slave bows to the powerful lord. Culturally, a new wave called the Generation of '98 originated as a response to this trauma, marking a renaissance in Spanish culture. Economically, the war benefited Spain, because after the war large sums of capital held by Spaniards in Cuba and the United States were returned to the peninsula and invested in Spain. The Japanese army follows the samurai code of Bushido, stipulating that surrender is a form of dishonor.

    Killing the Rising Sun takes readers to the bloody tropical-island battlefields of Peleliu and Iwo Jima and to the embattled Philippines, where General Douglas MacArthur has made a triumphant return and is plotting a full-scale invasion of Japan. Robert Oppenheimer and his team of scientists are preparing to test the deadliest weapon known to mankind. In Washington, DC, FDR dies in office and Harry Truman ascends to the presidency, only to face the most important political decision in history: whether to use that weapon. And in Tokyo, Emperor Hirohito, who is considered a deity by his subjects, refuses to surrender, despite a massive and mounting death toll.

    The liberation of Europe and the destruction of the Third Reich is a story of courage and enduring triumph, of calamity and miscalculation. In this first volume of the Liberation Trilogy, Rick Atkinson shows why no modern reader can understand the ultimate victory of the Allied powers without a grasp of the great drama that unfolded in North Africa in and That first year of the Allied war was a pivotal point in American history, the moment when the United States began to act like a great power.

    Beginning with the daring amphibious invasion in November , An Army at Dawn follows the American and British armies as they fight the French in Morocco and Algeria, and then take on the Germans and Italians in Tunisia. Battle by battle, an inexperienced and sometimes poorly led army gradually becomes a superb fighting force. Central to the tale are the extraordinary but fallible commanders who come to dominate the battlefield: Eisenhower, Patton, Bradley, Montgomery, and Rommel.

    Brilliantly researched, rich with new material and vivid insights, Atkinson's narrative provides the definitive history of the war in North Africa. Japan's business executives have long applied Musashi's teachings to their business methods. This book - the original life-guide by Japan's greatest warrior - means you can do so too. Written in by the most famous and unconquerable of all samurai, A Book of Five Rings is the classic guide to kendo swordmanship and a distillation of the philosophies of Zen, Shinto and Confucius.

    The West is now discovering what the Japanese have always known: that the ancient wisdom of the Samurai Way provides a strategy for decision and action in all areas of life - the home, the battleground and the boardroom. He certainly has no love for Alfred, whom he considers a pious weakling and no match for Viking savagery, yet when Alfred unexpectedly defeats the Danes and the Danes themselves turn on Uhtred, he is finally forced to choose sides. By now he is a young man, in love, trained to fight and ready to take his place in the dreaded shield wall.

    From to , U. Kyle, who was tragically killed in , writes honestly about the pain of war—including the deaths of two close SEAL teammates—and in moving first-person passages throughout, his wife, Taya, speaks openly about the strains of war on their family, as well as on Chris. Confronting Nazi evil is the subject of the latest installment in the mega-bestselling Killing series.

    As the true horrors of the Third Reich began to be exposed immediately after World War II, the Nazi war criminals who committed genocide went on the run. A few were swiftly caught, including the notorious SS leader, Heinrich Himmler. Others, however, evaded capture through a sophisticated Nazi organization designed to hide them. Killing the SS is the epic saga of the espionage and daring waged by self-styled "Nazi hunters. Over decades, these men and women scoured the world, tracking down the SS fugitives and bringing them to justice, which often meant death. Written in the fast-paced style of the Killing series, Killing the SS will educate and stun the reader.

    General George S. Patton, Jr. For almost seventy years, there has been suspicion that his death was not an accident--and may very well have been an act of assassination. Killing Patton takes readers inside the final year of the war and recounts the events surrounding Patton's tragic demise, naming names of the many powerful individuals who wanted him silenced.

    On May 2, , a twelve-man Special Forces team covertly infiltrated a small clearing in the jungles of neutral Cambodia—where U. Their objective, just miles over the Vietnam border, was to collect evidence that proved the North Vietnamese Army was using the Cambodian sanctuary as a major conduit for supplying troops and materiel to the south via the Ho Chi Minh Trail. Soon they found themselves surrounded by hundreds of NVA, under attack, low on ammunition, stacking the bodies of the dead as cover in a desperate attempt to survive the onslaught.

    When Special Forces Staff Sergeant Roy Benavidez heard their distress call, he jumped aboard the next helicopter bound for the combat zone. What followed would become legend in the Special Operations community. Flown into the foray of battle by the th Assault Helicopter Company, Benavidez jumped from the hovering aircraft, ran nearly yards through withering enemy fire, and--despite being immediately and severely wounded--organized an extraordinary defense and rescue of the Special Forces team. Legend recounts the courage and commitment of those who fought in Vietnam in service of their country, and the story of one of the many unsung heroes of the war.

    This special enhanced edition features more than 10 exclusive videos with Chris Kyle and an additional 15 images and descriptions of the weapons used by the armed forces in their fight against terrorism overseas. Please note that due to the large file size of these special features this enhanced e-book may take longer to download then a standard e-book. No one is born a leader. Special forces training is no walk in the park.

    The rules are strict and they make sure you learn the hard way, pushing you beyond the limits of what is physically possible. There is no mercy. Even when you are bleeding and broken, to admit defeat is failure. To survive the gruelling selection process to become a member of the elite you need toughness, aggression, meticulous attention to detail and unrelenting self-discipline, all traits that make for the best leaders.

    In this fascinating, exhilarating and revealing book, Ant speaks about the highs and gut-wrenching lows of his life — from the thrill of passing Special Forces Selection to dealing with the early death of his father and ending up in prison on leaving the military — and draws valuable lessons that we can all use in our daily lives. Seventy-five years ago, he hit Omaha Beach with the first wave. Now Ray Lambert, ninety-eight years old, delivers one of the most remarkable memoirs of our time, a tour-de-force of remembrance evoking his role as a decorated World War II medic who risked his life to save the heroes of D-Day.

    At five a. Army Staff Sergeant Ray Lambert worked his way through a throng of nervous soldiers to a wind-swept deck on a troopship off the coast of Normandy, France. He thought about his wife and son—a boy he had yet to see. The brothers parted. Less than five hours later, after saving dozens of lives and being wounded at least three separate times, Ray would lose consciousness in the shallow water of the beach under heavy fire. He would wake on the deck of a landing ship to find his battered brother clinging to life next to him. Every Man a Hero is the unforgettable story not only of what happened in the incredible and desperate hours on Omaha Beach, but of the bravery and courage that preceded them, throughout the Second World War—from the sands of Africa, through the treacherous mountain passes of Sicily, and beyond to the greatest military victory the world has ever known.

    After the fall of France in June , London became the center of world political theater. For the U. While keeping the United States officially neutral, Franklin D. Roosevelt devised an unprecedented strategy, leading to the revolutionary idea of lend-lease. But was Winston Churchill—famous as a speechmaker but regarded by many as a reckless politician and possibly a drunk—a good bet? To find the answer, Roosevelt dispatched his closest associate, Harry Hopkins, to Britain on a mission. Hopkins's endorsement of Churchill put an end to FDR's doubts, and with the passage of the Lend-Lease Act the president sent Averell Harriman, a wealthy financier and entrepreneur, to London "to keep the British Isles afloat.

    Filled with vivid details and great storytelling, To Keep the British Isles Afloat explores the still-misunderstood beginnings of the unique Anglo-American alliance in World War II, offering an intriguing new look at Roosevelt's thinking and a fresh perspective on the relationship between the president and the prime minister.

    The astonishing true account of John Chapman, Medal of Honor recipient and Special Ops Combat Controller, and his heroic one-man stand during the Afghan War, as he sacrificed his life to save the lives of 23 comrades-in-arms. In the predawn hours of March 4, , just below the 10,foot peak of a mountain in eastern Afghanistan, a fierce battle raged. Chapman, leading the charge, was gravely wounded in the initial assault. Believing he was dead, his SEAL leader ordered a retreat.

    Chapman regained consciousness alone, with the enemy closing in on three sides. John Chapman's subsequent display of incredible valor--first saving the lives of his SEAL teammates and then, knowing he was mortally wounded, single-handedly engaging two dozen hardened fighters to save the lives of an incoming rescue squad--posthumously earned him the Medal of Honor.

    Chapman is the first airman in nearly fifty years to be given the distinction reserved for America's greatest heroes. Alone at Dawn is also a behind-the-scenes look at the Air Force Combat Controllers: the world's deadliest and most versatile special operations force, whose members must not only exceed the qualifications of Navy SEAL and Army Delta Force teams but also act with sharp decisiveness and deft precision--even in the face of life-threatening danger.

    Drawing from firsthand accounts, classified documents, dramatic video footage, and extensive interviews with leaders and survivors of the operation, Alone at Dawn is the story of an extraordinary man's brave last stand and the brotherhood that forged him. From the bestselling author of the Liberation Trilogy comes the extraordinary first volume of his new trilogy about the American Revolution Rick Atkinson, author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning An Army at Dawn and two other superb books about World War II, has long been admired for his deeply researched, stunningly vivid narrative histories.

    When diplomacy fails, and war is unwise, the president calls on the CIA's Special Activities Division, a highly-classified branch of the CIA and the most effective, black operations force in the world. Originally known as the president's guerrilla warfare corps, SAD conducts risky and ruthless operations that have evolved over time to defend America from its enemies.

    Member list

    With unprecedented access to forty-two men and women who proudly and secretly worked on CIA covert operations from the dawn of the Cold War to the present day, along with declassified documents and deep historical research, Pulitzer Prize finalist Annie Jacobsen unveils-like never before-a complex world of individuals working in treacherous environments populated with killers, connivers and saboteurs. Despite Hollywood notions of off-book operations and external secret hires, covert action is actually one piece in a colossal foreign policy machine.

    Jacobsen's exclusive interviews-with members of the CIA's Senior Intelligence Service equivalent to the Pentagon's generals , its counterterrorism chiefs, targeting officers, and Special Activities Division's Ground Branch operators who conduct today's close-quarters killing operations around the world-reveal,for the first time, the enormity of this shocking, controversial and morally complex terrain. Is the CIA's paramilitary army America's weaponized strength, or a liability to its principled standing in the world?

    Every operation reported in this book, however unsettling, is legal. From the Trojan Horse to a photograph snapped in Vietnam, world history has been shaped as much by chance and error as by courage and heroism. Despite impossible odds, invincible armies fall in bitter defeat to weaker opponents. How and why does this happen? What decides the fate of battle? In this fascinating book, Erik Durschmied takes us through the major conflicts of history—from Agincourt to the Civil War, from Crimea to the Gulf War—and reveals how, in war, it is the improbable and the inconceivable that determine events.

    While not every title we publish becomes a New York Times bestseller or a national bestseller, we are committed to books on subjects that are sometimes overlooked and to authors whose work might not otherwise find a home. Area 51 It is the most famous military installation in the world. And it doesn't exist. Located a mere seventy-five miles outside of Las Vegas in Nevada's desert, the base has never been acknowledged by the U.

    The Crucible - Abigail Monologue

    Myths and hypotheses about Area 51 have long abounded, thanks to the intense secrecy enveloping it. Some claim it is home to aliens, underground tunnel systems, and nuclear facilities. Others believe that the lunar landing itself was filmed there. The prevalence of these rumors stems from the fact that no credible insider has ever divulged the truth about his time inside the base.

    Until now. Annie Jacobsen had exclusive access to nineteen men who served the base proudly and secretly for decades and are now aged , and unprecedented access to fifty-five additional military and intelligence personnel, scientists, pilots, and engineers linked to the secret base, thirty-two of whom lived and worked there for extended periods. In Area 51, Jacobsen shows us what has really gone on in the Nevada desert, from testing nuclear weapons to building super-secret, supersonic jets to pursuing the War on Terror.

    This is the first book based on interviews with eye witnesses to Area 51 history, which makes it the seminal work on the subject. Filled with formerly classified information that has never been accurately decoded for the public, Area 51 weaves the mysterious activities of the top-secret base into a gripping narrative, showing that facts are often more fantastic than fiction, especially when the distinction is almost impossible to make.

    In boyhood, Louis Zamperini was an incorrigible delinquent. As a teenager, he channeled his defiance into running, discovering a prodigious talent that had carried him to the Berlin Olympics. But when World War II began, the athlete became an airman, embarking on a journey that led to a doomed flight on a May afternoon in When his Army Air Forces bomber crashed into the Pacific Ocean, against all odds, Zamperini survived, adrift on a foundering life raft.

    Ahead of Zamperini lay thousands of miles of open ocean, leaping sharks, thirst and starvation, enemy aircraft, and, beyond, a trial even greater. Driven to the limits of endurance, Zamperini would answer desperation with ingenuity; suffering with hope, resolve, and humor; brutality with rebellion. His fate, whether triumph or tragedy, would be suspended on the fraying wire of his will.

    Unbroken is an unforgettable testament to the resilience of the human mind, body, and spirit, brought vividly to life by Seabiscuit author Laura Hillenbrand. Stephen E. And at its peak—in Holland and the Ardennes—Easy Company was as good a rifle company as any in the world.

    From the rigorous training in Georgia in to the disbanding in , Stephen E. Ambrose tells the story of this remarkable company. In combat, the reward for a job well done is the next tough assignment, and as they advanced through Europe, the men of Easy kept getting the tough assignments. They parachuted into France early D-Day morning and knocked out a battery of four mm cannon looking down Utah Beach; they parachuted into Holland during the Arnhem campaign; they were the Battered Bastards of the Bastion of Bastogne, brought in to hold the line, although surrounded, in the Battle of the Bulge; and then they spearheaded the counteroffensive.